Ep. 034 The Forgetting Curve and Knitting

Welcome to Episode 34:  The Forgetting Curve and Knitting

Brainy thing:   21:40  Redwood Curtain 31:40

What We’re Learning from our Knitting:

Margaret doesn’t realize that the Forgetting Curve threw her a curve on the Fish Lip Kiss heel until she messed up.    She made a sparkly pair of blue socks out of Knit Circus Pixie Dust fingering  weight  merino/silk/nylon/polyamide/metallic yarn.   Persie's sparkle socks
Years ago she got a similar yarn as a kit from Knit Circus for Jaala Spiro’s half circle Corrina Shawl in the Casseopeia  color way.   When she ran out (she didn’t do a gauge swatch—for shame)  Jaala Spiro dyed a skein that would especially go with the older color way.  So she had quite a bit of the yarn leftover.
corrina shawl
Along with the Vanessa Ives Mystery Shawl, Catherine continues making socks for the Afghans for Afghans organization.  This time she use Kate Atherly’s Baby Socks pattern .   She also made Lee Burstein’s Organic Cotton Heirloom Baby Hat , but out of wool instead of cotton.
Catherine continues to make progress on her meditative Vanessa Ives Shawl.

Catherine continues to make progress on her meditative Vanessa Ives Shawl.

BABY SOCKS Kate Atherley
Brainy Thing:   The Forgetting Curve
Baffled by her botched attempt at the Fish Kiss Lips Heel (she did it once and she thought she remembered it) Margaret delves into the world of forgetting and meets our old friend Hermann Ebbinghaus who first described the Forgetting Curve.  Elizabeth Loftus, a cognitive psychologist, describes different types of forgetting.
Behind the Redwood Curtain:
Catherine tells us about an icon of the Humboldt Bay, the statue of “The Fisherman” by Dick Crane.  (http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/2011634667/)  He and his wife Salli own Dancing Crane Studios.
Knitting Tip:
Listener Kate Pricey offers a tip about making knitting into the Backward Loop Cast-on easier — go through the back loop.
Knitting Tip Contest:
Five back issues of Pom Pom magazine is the prize for a randomly selected winner from our Knitting Tip thread of on our group on Ravelry.pom pom smallest
Podcast Business:
We continue to have an on-going incentive prize for each 100 people who join our Teaching Your Brain to Knit podcast group on Ravelry.  (http://www.ravelry.com/groups/teaching-your-brain-to-knit)

Ep. 030 What is the Distributive Spacing Effect and How does it help us to learn fiber arts?

Brainy Thing:   15:47           Behind the Redwood Curtain:  25:35

Welcome to Episode:  How the Distributive Practice Effect or Spacing Effect can help you learn skills in the fiber Arts.

What we’re learning from our Knitting
Catherine got a lot of satisfaction by completing Laura Nelkin’s Butin Collar.

Catherine's butin collar

Margaret created felted bangles from Mags Kandis’ Bevy of Bangles pattern, from the book Gifted, Lovely little things to knit and crochet by Mags Kandis or get them for free from the Interweave website.

Brainy Thing:  The Distributive Practice Effect
Catherine talks about the Distributive Practice Effect, first described by Hermann Ebbinghaus.   In psychology,it is talked about as the Spacing Effect.   Essentially, practicing something a little bit every day is more effective in learning than practicing for a long time for one day a week.

Behind the Redwood Curtain:   Ferndale, CA, the Victorian Village

Catherine introduces us to Ferndale, CA which has a large number of well preserved Victorian buildings.   It is very well decorated around Christmas time.


Knitting Tip:
Margaret shares a tip from No Sheep for You by Amy Singer:   When knitting socks in Cotton or a yarn with little memory, use ribbing to help the sock

Podcast Business

The incentive prize for signing up for the Teaching Your Brain to Knit Ravelry Group: